Tag Archives: world book day

Celebrating World Book Day with our students!

Happy World Book Day! To celebrate, we asked our students to tell us about the best book that they’ve studied so far as part of their degree at the Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies. Here’s what they said:

Nicole, 3rd year English Language and Literaturenicole-2

Book: Irvin Welsh, Trainspotting

Module: Introduction to Literary Studies

This was one of the first novels I studied at university and it has stuck in my mind! Even though it was pretty hard to understand because of the Scottish dialect, the message behind it is amazing. I loved T2 Trainspotting as well!

Rumaanah, 2nd Year,  English Literature

Book: Kamila Shamsie, Burnt Shadows

Module: Making Memory

What I loved about this book was how much ground and history it covered; it starts in Japan on the day of the bomb, moves to India pre- and post-partition and then ends in the USA after 9/11. It includes characters of colour who are multi-faceted and complex, which I enjoyed. Not every book manages to avoid stereotypical representations. I enjoyed the module in general because we got to debate a lot of interesting topics and it felt very current. The reading list was also great.

rumanah-2

Lois, 2nd Year, English Literaturelois-2

Book: Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Module: Monsters

I loved reading Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Its complex monster and exploration of human morality really makes it a classic.

 

 

secret-history-2Lauren, 3rd Year, English Literature and Creative Writing

Book: Donna Tart, The Secret History

Module: The Novels and Novellas

The Secret History is a book I fell in love with during The Novels and Novellas Module. We read the opening in class and I wanted to know more, so I got a copy and didn’t put it down for a week. It’s now one of my dissertation texts.

Melissa, 2nd Year English Literaturemelissa-2

Book: Matthew Lewis, The Monk

Module: Nineteenth Century

I like The Monk by Matthew Lewis not just because of the Gothic motifs in the text or it’s vivid imagery, but because of how it reflects the religious turmoil of the period in its narrative.

 

Mikki, 3rd Year, English Literature

Book: Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland

Module: Other Worlds

“But I don’t want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked.

“Oh, you can’t help that,” said the Cat: “we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.”

“How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice.

“You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here.”

alice-in-wonderland-2

tagore-2Nikhat, 3rd Year, English Literature

Book: Rabindranath Tagore, A Grain of Sand

Module: Extended Essay

A Grain of Sand: Chokher Bali by Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore is one of the texts I am using for my extended essay. I love the way in which Tagore portrays the complexities of human relationships and emotions through a simple narrative. I really do wish that I could fluently read Bengali or that Tagore himself was able to translate his novels as he did with his poetry and short stories. Nevertheless, I really enjoyed reading the novel and it was interesting to see how many of the issues he raised (like child marriage, women’s education and confinement to domestic spheres) are still relevant a century later.

 

 

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